Turn Up The AC

Dang Near Royalty

March 23, 2021 AC Fischer, Alexis Arralynn Season 1 Episode 69
Turn Up The AC
Dang Near Royalty
Chapters
Turn Up The AC
Dang Near Royalty
Mar 23, 2021 Season 1 Episode 69
AC Fischer, Alexis Arralynn

What does AC have in common with members of the British royal family? A lot, actually...

Special thanks to Alexis Arralynn for encouraging me to write...

Be sure to check out my other podcasts When The Bough Breaks and What I Like About You...

If you'd like to record your own episode of Turn Up The AC, send me an email to find out how [email protected]...

Thanks to itsjustnikia for introducing this episode!

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/acfischerpod)

Show Notes Transcript

What does AC have in common with members of the British royal family? A lot, actually...

Special thanks to Alexis Arralynn for encouraging me to write...

Be sure to check out my other podcasts When The Bough Breaks and What I Like About You...

If you'd like to record your own episode of Turn Up The AC, send me an email to find out how [email protected]...

Thanks to itsjustnikia for introducing this episode!

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/acfischerpod)

 Jeff Foxworthy said “If you ever start feeling like you have the goofiest, craziest, most dysfunctional family in the world, all you have to do is go to a state fair. Because in five minutes, you’ll be going, ‘you know, we’re alright. We are dang near royalty.’”

Recently I watched Oprah interview Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. I was expecting a dramatic tell-all exposé. Instead, I found myself watching two people who I could easily relate to.

I’m not suggesting that I have any direct experience with being a part of the British royal family. I’m saying that, unfathomable financial wealth aside, I have directly experienced literally every thing that Harry and Meg described. I think most of us have, actually.

All of us are born into the expectations of others. Our parents expect that we will be like them. Of course, not all parents expect us to be clones of themselves but that doesn’t mean that they don’t expect us to take after them in some ways. 

Of course, the expectations we’re born into inevitably lead to someone being disappointed. These disappointments typically couple with some sort of consequence. These consequences don’t need to be spelled out, as we all have our own experiences.

Those of us who have older siblings are born into situations where we are in competition with them from birth. They are forced into competition with us immediately upon our arrival. Maybe we’re not fighting for anything as glamorous as an eventual seat on the throne, but we are fighting for attention, love, resources, toys, and any other number of things.

We all grow up under scrutiny. The royals have the tabloids and the paparazzi. The rest of us have teachers, parents, and community. Someone is always watching, and someone’s reactions always have to be considered. In a way, living in the public eye is unavoidable.

Those of us who have children, fear for their safety. We don’t need to have a royal security detail pulled to understand that the world can be a scary place. Sometimes the realization that our family can’t always be there to help or protect our children is overwhelming enough.

We all consider how well our values fit with our families’ values. We all want our children to thrive in an accepting and functional family environment, while carrying the uncertainty of how realistic that is. Sadly, too many of us realize that our children are not going to fit as well as we’d like them to because they’re unacceptably different in some way.

Each of us, in our own way, is struggling under the weight of a family crown. Sometimes it’s tied to an inability to measure up. Sometimes it has more to do with an inability to move past our family’s reputation.

The wonderful thing is that each of us has the option of giving it all up in favour of a life all our own. We’re entitled to our royal birthright but we’re not obligated to it.